Manjul Bhargava

About Manjul Bhargava

Who is it?: Mathematician
Birth Day: August 08, 1974
Birth Place: Hamilton, Canada, United States
Alma mater: Harvard University Princeton University
Known for: higher composition laws 15 and 290 theorems factorial function average rank of elliptic curves
Awards: Fields Medal (2014) Infosys Prize (2012) Fermat Prize (2011) Cole Prize (2008) Clay Research Award (2005) SASTRA Ramanujan Prize (2005) Blumenthal Award (2005) Hasse Prize (2003) Morgan Prize (1996) Hoopes Prize (1996) Hertz Fellowship (1996)
Institutions: Princeton University Leiden University University of Hyderabad
Doctoral advisor: Andrew Wiles
Doctoral students: Alison Miller Melanie Wood

Manjul Bhargava

Manjul Bhargava was born on August 08, 1974 in Hamilton, Canada, United States, is Mathematician. Manjul Bhargava is a Canadian-American mathematician of Indian origin known for his contributions to number theory. A winner of the Fields Medal—a prestigious award given to mathematicians under 40 years of age—in 2014, he currently serves as the R. Brandon Fradd Professor of Mathematics at Princeton University and the Stieltjes Professor of Number Theory at Leiden University. Born in Ontario, Canada, to parents who had migrated from India, he was introduced to mathematical concepts at an early age by his mother who was a mathematician at Hofstra University. He grew up to be a brilliant student and was highly gifted in mathematics—he completed all of his high school math and computer science courses by the age 14. Following high school, he completed his B.A. from Harvard University and was awarded the Morgan Prize for his research as an undergraduate. He received a Hertz Fellowship to attend Princeton University from where he completed his doctorate and embarked on an academic career. He has made several important contributions to mathematics over his career and is especially known for his 14 new Gauss-style composition laws, derived from the works of the German mathematical genius Carl Friedrich Gauss.
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As per our current Database, Manjul Bhargava is still alive (as per Wikipedia, Last update: May 10, 2020).

🎂 Manjul Bhargava - Age, Bio, Faces and Birthday

Currently, Manjul Bhargava is 45 years, 11 months and 3 days old. Manjul Bhargava will celebrate 46rd birthday on a Saturday 8th of August 2020. Below we countdown to Manjul Bhargava upcoming birthday.

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Popular As Manjul Bhargava
Occupation Scientists
Age 46 years old
Zodiac Sign Virgo
Born August 08, 1974 (Hamilton, Canada, United States)
Birthday August 08
Town/City Hamilton, Canada, United States
Nationality United States

🌙 Zodiac

Manjul Bhargava’s zodiac sign is Virgo. According to astrologers, Virgos are always paying attention to the smallest details and their deep sense of humanity makes them one of the most careful signs of the zodiac. Their methodical approach to life ensures that nothing is left to chance, and although they are often tender, their heart might be closed for the outer world. This is a sign often misunderstood, not because they lack the ability to express, but because they won’t accept their feelings as valid, true, or even relevant when opposed to reason. The symbolism behind the name speaks well of their nature, born with a feeling they are experiencing everything for the first time.

🌙 Chinese Zodiac Signs

Manjul Bhargava was born in the Year of the Tiger. Those born under the Chinese Zodiac sign of the Tiger are authoritative, self-possessed, have strong leadership qualities, are charming, ambitious, courageous, warm-hearted, highly seductive, moody, intense, and they’re ready to pounce at any time. Compatible with Horse or Dog.

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Awards and nominations:

Bhargava has won several awards for his research, the most prestigious being the Fields Medal, the highest award in the field of mathematics, which he won in 2014.

Bhargava is the third youngest full professor in Princeton University's history, after Charles Fefferman and John Pardon.

In addition, he won the Morgan Prize and Hertz Fellowship in 1996, a Clay 5-year Research Fellowship, the Merten M. Hasse Prize from the MAA in 2003, the Clay Research Award in 2005, and the Leonard M. and Eleanor B. Blumenthal Award for the Advancement of Research in Pure Mathematics in 2005.

Peter Sarnak of Princeton University has said of Bhargava:

He was named one of Popular Science Magazine’s "Brilliant 10" in November 2002. He won the $10,000 SASTRA Ramanujan Prize, shared with Kannan Soundararajan, awarded by SASTRA in 2005 at Thanjavur, India, for his outstanding contributions to number theory.

In 2008, Bhargava was awarded the American Mathematical Society's Cole Prize. The citation reads:

In 2011, he was awarded the Fermat Prize for "various generalizations of the Davenport-Heilbronn estimates and for his startling recent results (with Arul Shankar) on the average rank of elliptic curves".

In 2011, he delivered the Hedrick lectures of the MAA in Lexington, Kentucky. He was also the 2011 Simons Lecturer at MIT.

In 2012, Bhargava was named an inaugural recipient of the Simons Investigator Award, and became a fellow of the American Mathematical Society in its inaugural class of fellows.

He was awarded the 2012 Infosys Prize in mathematics for his "extraordinarily original work in algebraic number theory, which has revolutionized the way in which number fields and elliptic curves are counted".

In 2013, he was elected to the National Academy of Sciences.

In 2014, Bhargava was awarded the Fields Medal at the International Congress of Mathematicians in Seoul for "developing powerful new methods in the geometry of numbers, which he applied to count rings of small rank and to bound the average rank of elliptic curves".

In 2015, he was awarded the Padma Bhushan, the third highest civilian award of India.

Biography/Timeline

1992

Bhargava was born in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada in a Hindu family to immigrant parents from India and he grew up primarily in Long Island, New York. His mother Mira Bhargava, a Mathematician at Hofstra University, was his first mathematics Teacher. He completed all of his high school math and computer science courses by age 14. He attended Plainedge High School in North Massapequa, and graduated in 1992 as the class valedictorian. He obtained his B.A. from Harvard University in 1996. For his research as an undergraduate, he was awarded the 1996 Morgan Prize. Bhargava went on to receive his doctorate from Princeton in 2001, supervised by Andrew Wiles and funded by a Hertz Fellowship. He was a visiting scholar at the Institute for Advanced Study in 2001-02, and at Harvard University in 2002-03. Princeton appointed him as a tenured Full Professor in 2003. He was appointed to the Stieltjes Chair in Leiden University in 2010.

1996

In addition, he won the Morgan Prize and Hertz Fellowship in 1996, a Clay 5-year Research Fellowship, the Merten M. Hasse Prize from the MAA in 2003, the Clay Research Award in 2005, and the Leonard M. and Eleanor B. Blumenthal Award for the Advancement of Research in Pure Mathematics in 2005.

2008

In 2008, Bhargava was awarded the American Mathematical Society's Cole Prize. The citation reads:

2011

In 2011, he delivered the Hedrick lectures of the MAA in Lexington, Kentucky. He was also the 2011 Simons Lecturer at MIT.

2012

He was awarded the 2012 Infosys Prize in mathematics for his "extraordinarily original work in algebraic number theory, which has revolutionized the way in which number fields and elliptic curves are counted".

2013

In 2013, he was elected to the National Academy of Sciences.

2014

In 2014, Bhargava was awarded the Fields Medal at the International Congress of Mathematicians in Seoul for "developing powerful new methods in the geometry of numbers, which he applied to count rings of small rank and to bound the average rank of elliptic curves".

2015

In 2015, he was awarded the Padma Bhushan, the third highest civilian award of India.

2019

He was named one of Popular Science Magazine’s "Brilliant 10" in November 2002. He won the $10,000 SASTRA Ramanujan Prize, shared with Kannan Soundararajan, awarded by SASTRA in 2005 at Thanjavur, India, for his outstanding contributions to number theory.

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